Christmas Eve 1968: From Earth to the Heavens and Back

Bill Anders, Jim Lovell, Frank Borman -- December 24, 1968

Scriptures for today:
Genesis 1: 1-10

Source: NASA.gov

Please click this link for the "Live from Apollo 8" historic broadcast.

To download this week's sermon, right-click on this link then
select the "Save Target As" option, and save for listening later.


Please click here to recommend this audio stream to a friend, OR, click here to add yourself to our mailing list, OR. click here to send a comment to our Web Ministry.

Apollo 8 was the first space mission to broadcast live images from off Earth, the first mission to the moon and safely back to Earth, and the first public sermon given from an extra-terrestrial pulpit.

Christmas Eve, 1968. As one of the most turbulent, tragic years in American history drew to a close, millions around the world were watching and listening as the Apollo 8 astronauts - Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and Bill Anders - became the first humans to orbit another world.

As their command module floated above the lunar surface, the astronauts beamed back images of the moon and Earth and took turns reading from the book of Genesis, closing with a wish for everyone "on the good Earth."

The Apollo 8 astronauts got where they were that Christmas Eve because of a bold, improvisational call by NASA. With the clock ticking on President Kennedy's challenge to land on the moon by decade's end, delays with the lunar module were threatening to slow the Apollo program. So NASA decided to change mission plans and send the Apollo 8 crew all the way to the moon without a lunar module on the first manned flight of the massive Saturn V rocket.

The crew rocketed into orbit on December 21, and after circling the moon 10 times on Christmas Eve, it was time to come home. On Christmas morning, mission control waited anxiously for word that Apollo 8's engine burn to leave lunar orbit had worked. They soon got confirmation when Lovell radioed, "Roger, please be informed there is a Santa Claus."

The crew splashed down in the Pacific on December 27. A lunar landing was still months away, but for the first time ever, humans from Earth had visited the moon and returned home safely.

For more information about the astronauts Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and Bill Anders, click their names.